Miles Associates LLC

Jim Miles – IT & IT Security Consultant – Web Sites for Growing Organizations

IBM bans Siri

IBM has banned Apple’s Siri digital assistant–along with other apps and services–from its networks out of concern for security and privacy. Big Blue realizes the move to enable workers to bring their own devices to work offers both benefits and challenges.

Via CIO Insight

MS NUads: They watch you watching them

Interactive NUads advertisements tied to the Kinect sensor will roll out in late spring, Microsoft tells CNET. But will all other Kinect apps be as privacy-sensitive?

via Microsoft readies NUads: They watch you watching them | Security & Privacy – CNET News.

Two weeks of smartphone charging in your pocket

Juice in a box. Lilliputian's portable fuel cell can deliver between 10 to 14 full charges for an iPhone with one replaceable cartridge.Fuel cell maker Lilliputian Systems today announced that Brookstone will be the first retailer to carry its portable USB power source, which will be sold under Brookstone’s brand. The fuel cell device is about the size of a thick smartphone, and the lighter fluid-filled cartridges are about the same size as a cigarette lighter.


 

via Two weeks of smartphone charging in your pocket | Cutting Edge – CNET News.

Malware poses updates: Why the FBI is warning travelers

Those “critical update” notices you get, especially while traveling, may not be what you think. Michael Kassner gets the low-down on this serious threat as well as the Evilgrade platform.

via Malware poses as software updates: Why the FBI is warning travelers | TechRepublic.

Blogger: “I fell for the oldest social engineering trick in the book”

I’ve written countless stories about social engineering, with security experts far and wide telling our readers never to open a link from someone we don’t know. We’ve also published advice about making sure a message from a friend is for real before opening. That didn’t stop me from falling for one of the oldest tricks in the book.

Go ahead and have a good laugh at my expense. I deserve it.

via I fell for the oldest social engineering trick in the book | CSO Blogs.

Study finds major flaws in single sign-on systems

The single sign-on protocols that allow users to sign in to a range of websites with their Google or Facebook accounts suffer from security flaws that could allow scammers to log in as somebody else, security researchers have reported.

via Study finds major flaws in single sign-on systems – Computerworld.

Windows 7 services you may not need

Check these out; you might be able to disable services that you’ll never need: 10+ Windows 7 services you may not need | TechRepublic.

Attacked by Anonymous: How to defend

Organizations have to be ready to face possible DoS attacks. Here are some basic strategies that can be used to defend against an attack:

  • Configure your routers and firewalls to stop invalid IP addresses and filter out protocols that are not needed. Some firewalls and routers include features to prevent TCP/UDP floods. Also, make sure that logging is enabled in all your devices and that you can reliably examine them to identify attacks and if needed, turn them over to law enforcement authorities.
  • An intrusion-detection/prevention system (IDS/IPS) can detect the misuse of valid protocols as attack vectors. Depending on the products and your network configuration, it’s possible to automatically block the attack traffic.
  • Get help from your provider. This way, attack traffic can be blocked closer to its source before it can clog your organization’s bandwidth.
  • You should have an incident response plan in place and be ready to activate it. If an attack comes, everyone should know how to respond and who to contact both inside and outside the organization (law enforcement for instance).
  • Ensure that you have means of communicating with your users and/or customers. Be as honest and forthcoming as you can about the incident.

Read the rest at Attacked by Anonymous: How to defend against a denial-of-service | TechRepublic.

Virtual Teams Can Outperform Traditional Teams

Teams can be highly effective even when members have never met in person. In fact, virtual teams can actually outperform traditional co-located groups. An extensive study of 80 software development teams with programmers from the United States, South America, Europe, and Asia proved that virtual teams can lead to increased efficiency and better business results, but only if they are managed to maximize the potential benefits while minimizing the disadvantages….

But here’s the rub. Dispersed teams can outperform co-located ones only if — and this is a big “if” — they are managed properly. Here are a few guidelines…

via Virtual Teams Can Outperform Traditional Teams – Keith Ferrazzi – Harvard Business Review.

Tests show Windows 8 much faster than Windows 7

One thing you’ll like about Windows 8: Even though it’s only in its preview form, it’s already faster than Windows 7. And as development proceeds, it should only get even faster.

[PC World] ran Windows 7 and Windows 8 Consumer Preview on the same machine and found that Windows 8 was 14% faster than Windows 7 on the WorldBench 7, the magazine’s comprehensive performance benchmark. It also started up 35% faster, and was 50% faster when it comes to Web performance. Windows 8 lagged behind Windows 7 in an office productivity test by 8 percent, and was essentially tied with Windows 7 for a content creation test.

via Tests show Windows 8 Consumer Preview is much faster than Windows 7 – Computerworld Blogs.